Can You Name All The Blue Hues, Shades, Tints, Tones And Other Variations?

Can You Name All The Blue Hues, Shades, Tints, Tones And Other Variations?

There are hundreds of blue shades and we have many examples of a certain color name assigned to different HEX codes. On the other hand several blue colors are known under more than one name. We’ll try to present as many blue tints and hues as possible in slightly different arrangement as you might expect. Each color carries its own story and this article is touching dozens of them.

Royal cobalt blue For Trust And Authority

Royal cobalt blue is used to express and emphasize authority for many centuries. It is no coincidence police uniforms are so often blue or mainly of blue color. Its effect on human psychology is in most cases calming and ancient culture associated it heaven and gods. The reason is obvious: while royal cobalt blue is not so widespread in nature as some other colors, it dominates sky and water, two major elements in nature, both closely associated with divinity.

When King of England (George III) needed color with strong impact to immediately express royalty, several clothiers across the country tried to develop the right color and shade. Ultimately Scutts Bridge Mill won the contest. Queen Charlotte wore the robe in this color, what gave the color an alternative name Queen Blue.

With addition of white or black we can instantly create dozens of shades and tints for the same color and with different processes of production and addition of some red or yellow inevitably followed. Especially addition of red led to dramatic changes, what can be seen at royal purple above. It’s actually pretty interesting to find out how many ways are to make color royal cobalt blue, which is szpposed to be a so-called basic or primary color.

Around 1950 another, lighter shade of royal cobalt blue became known as royal and with an introduction of computer graphics (plus numerous limitations, which were gradually changed) and so called web safe colors, we got almost more than we can handle. Simply naming colors with numbers seemed a practical idea, yet it doesn’t guarantee the standardization.

This article comes from drawingblog edit released