How to Prepare Ready to Use Enamel Powder

Ready-to-use enamel powder are basically mixed by several kinds of enamel frits and milling additives after ball milling. It mainly contains frits, clay, electrolytes, refractors and pigments. Ready-to use enamel powder can be divided into two types.

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Complete Ready-to use enamel powder: The grinding process for this enamel powder is completely finished. It can be used just by stirring in a mixer.

Preparation:

1. Put sufficient amount of water into the mixing vessel. The mixer with a high shear force is recommended.

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2. Add ready-to-use enamel powder gradually into the mixing vessel until the demanded enamel density is reached. Baume can be used instead of a vessel with fix volume, since it is easier to operate.

3. Stir or ball mill for 10 – 15 minutes. If submersion enamel is going to be used, mixing for overnight is recommended to achieve the enamel stability.

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4. Sieved the prepared enamel slurry by a 80 mesh sieve and then it becomes ready to use.

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Partial Ready-to-use enamel powder: The grinding process of this enamel powder is partially completed. This enamel powder should be grinded by the user in a mill up to the demanded fineness.

Preparation:

1,Put enamel powder into a mill.

2,Add sufficient amount of water into the mill.

3,Grind the enamel powder up to the demanded fineness.

4,Discharge the enamel slurry and after adjusting its suspension feature, the enamel powder is ready to use.

White Enamel Powder for Overglaze Painting

White Enamel for Porcelain, in white powder form in large, 2 dram glass vial with screw on lid.

This White Enamel Powder for all overglaze painting has a high relief and will not pop off. Use the OJ3, Pollyanna Medium for both enamel and raised paste work. Mix to a thick toothpaste consistency with this medium. Then add one drop of pure turpentine at a time until strings. It will make wonderful dots, scrolls – then thin with more turpentine to make longer, even lines (won’t be quite as raised if thinned more) Fire to Cone .017, – .018 1443 – 1386 F, 784 – 752 C

You can add any regular overglaze paint to the enamel to make your own colors! Add the color after the mixture strings – you may have to add some more turpentine (never add more of the medium as that will make it flatten more!) Do not add gold over this Enamel. Use the JTX Josephine Texture Paste – Base for Gold for a white, raised relief which can be covered with Gold or Silver.

This article comes from thegoodstuff edit released

Enamel Powder Transparent Red

This is a low temperature resin based enamel powder which can be used on metals such as silver or copper, along with glass, wood, porcelain and stone. As with all enamels, this Transparent Red enamel does not require the use of a kiln, as it can be fired in a conventional oven at 150°C.

This fabulous product enables anyone to create enamelled jewellery designs with ease. Simply sieve onto your chosen backing, transfer to a firing plate, and fire in a pre-heated oven at 150°C for 3 – 5 minutes. Care must be taken when removing your piece from the oven as it will be hot. A Sieve Top (861 700) may be useful for easy application of the powder.

This article comes from cooksongold edit released

Efcolor Enamel Powder

Efcolor low temperature enamel powder can be used on metal, glass, wood, porcelain, ceramic, stone, and other materials. No kiln required, Efcolor hardens at 150 °C and can be fired in a domestic oven, hotplate, or the Efcolor tea-light stove. Will withstand temperatures up to 180 °C.

About Enamel Powder

Enamel Powder is an almost forgotten art.

The types of art pieces you can make are infinite.

From jewelry to complete paintings are possible, It’s a surprise every time to see how enamel powder during cooling shows its colors.

Do not think that nothing ever fails.

Often I have a beautiful piece in my hands, when suddenly, the annoying ticking sound that is heard announcing that the glass is cracked.

It is just exciting to shove the next piece in the oven to burn!

This article comes from watermanshop edit released