What is Vitreous Enamel Material?

Vitreous enamel material is simply a thin layer of glass fused at high temperature on to the surface of a metal.

The formal definition is : Vitreous enamel material can be defined as a material which is a vitreous solid obtained by smelting or fritting a mixture of inorganic materials.

The Collins English Dictionary defines enamel as “a coloured glassy substance, transparent or opaque, fused to the surface of articles made of metal, glass etc. for ornament or protection.” Vitreous enamel material is specifically on a metal base. It is thus defined as a vitreous, glass-like coating fused on to a metallic base.

It should not be confused with paint, which is sometimes called ‘enamel’. Paints cannot be vitreous enamel material. They do not have the hardness, heat resistance and colour stability that is only available with real vitreous enamel material. Beware of companies or products implying the use of enamel material. Check their credentials and warranties.

Vitreous enamel material is part of everyday life and found all around us. You will use it on many kitchen surfaces including cookers, saucepans and washing machine drums. You will find enamelled cast iron or steel baths and clock and watch faces. Out of doors, we use enamel material for street signs, Underground station signs, architectural panels, storage and treatment tanks and many other places. It is selected because it is weatherproof, vandal resistant, fireproof and because it lasts and lasts and lasts. Titanic’s Captain Smith’s enamelled bathtub has survived very well under the sea.

Enamel material is also used by artists and in jewellery, famously in Russia’s Fabergé eggs. Decorative enamelling was the first use of the process of enamelling, dating back to the 13th century BC. This type of enamel material is usually applied to copper and its alloys and to gold and silver. We make Vitreous Enamel material by smelting naturally occurring minerals, such as sand, feldspar, borax, soda ash, and sodium fluoride at temperatures between 1200 °C and 1350 °C until all of the raw materials have dissolved. Other metallic mineral may be added to give specific properties or colour. The molten glass which is formed is either quenched into water or through water-cooled rollers. This rapid cooling prevents crystallisation and is said to be in a metastable state. This material is called “frit”. To make a usable enamel the frit will be ground in a rotating ball mill either to produce a water-based slurry or a powder. Clays are used in the water-based products to give a product which can be applied to the metal by spraying, dipping or painting by brush. At the milling stage, other minerals will be added to give the properties which are required of the final enamel. Colour is introduced by the use of metal compounds. The recognisable blue enamel is produced using cobalt. Powdered enamels are applied by dusting or using electrostatic equipment. The final glassy finish so typical of vitreous enamel is produced by firing in furnaces at temperatures up to 900 °C. As it cools, it fuses to give glass-coated metal. This ‘firing’ process gives vitreous enamel material its unique combination of properties. The smooth glass-like surface is hard; it is scratch, chemical and fire resistant. It is easy to clean and hygienic. It all started 3500 years ago in Cyprus. Since 1500 BC, enamelling has been a wonderful, durable, attractive and reliable material. You will recognise it as the material used to produce the now highly collectable advertising signs produced during the early 20th Century.

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International standard chromium oxide green

Green chrome oxide and other pigmented oxides for a variety of applications including porcelain enamel, refractory, and more.

Applications:
1.Used in the dyeing agent of porcelain enamel and ceramic, leatheroid, structure material and fireproof material;
2.The chrome smelt and chromium carbide;
3.polishing material.;
4.catalyst, paint,ink.