The Vitreous Enamel Process

Vitreous enamel or porcelain enamel is the name given to glass bonding to a metal surface by fusion. A wide range of colors are produced by incorporating certain elements to the glass, mostly transition metals.

History

There is no evidence on how or where vitreous enamel making started, the earliest known articles are six enameled gold rings dating from the 13th century BC discovered in a Mycenaean tomb at Kouklia, Cyprus.

The Greeks were enameling as early as the 5th century BC. Julius Caesar found the Celtic inhabitants of Britain enameling in the 1st century BC.

During the Byzantine era (4th through 12th centuries) many enamel religious works were made. In Limoges, France the use of enamel painting technique was perfected in the 15th Century.

China’s earliest enamel works date from the 14th century, enameling was introduced in the area by the Muslims. Japan began enameling in the mid 1800’s with high quality results.

In the second half of the 19th century Russian jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé captivated Europe with his fantastic enameled eggs.

Vitreous Enamel Different Techniques

The glass used to enamel is crushed to a powder finer than granulated sugar and coarser than flour. Different elements especially metals are added to the glass to color it. This colored glass powder is then bonded to a metal surface, usually copper, silver or gold by fusion. The enameled metal piece is fired between 1000° to 1600° F in a kiln.

After 1 to 10 minutes, the piece is removed and cooled down to room temperature. Subsequent coats, or the adding of different colors, are applied. 10 to 20 firings are required to get the desired results. When ready the piece is polished.

The process mentioned above is the same for every enameling technique, what varies is the way the metal surface is prepared to receive the enamel or how the enamel is applied to it.

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Inorganic Pigments

Inorganic pigment is a kind of stable chemical physical structure formed by solid-phase reaction of many metal oxides under high temperature calcination (>800). The inorganic pigment features Excellent light resistance, weather resistance, high temperature resistance; Good covering power, tinting power, dispersion; no bleeding, no migration; Excellent acid-proof, alkali resistance, chemical resistance; Compatible with most thermoplastic and thermosetting plastic.

Applications of Inorganic Pigment

Outdoor plastic and masterbatch: such as PVC decorative panels, plastic steel window profiles, engineering plastics, masterbatch and so on.

Coatings: fluorocarbon coatings, powder coatings, coil coatings, automotive coatings, traffic marking coatings, camouflage coatings, aircraft coating, marine coatings, ultra-durable outdoor architectural coatings, printing inks and industrial coatings.

Building products: cement, concrete, roof construction materials, ceramics, stained glass.

Environmental areas: food packaging containers, plastic utensils, plastic toys, painting coatings.

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Ground Coat Frits

Range of Ground Coat Frits suitable for application on Pan Support, Silencers, Hollow-ware and Signboards.

– Cobalt based Ground Coat Frits

– Nickel based Ground Coat Frits

We offer ground coat frits, glazes, colours and raw materials for use in the various fields of ceramics like traditional ceramics, decorative tiles, enamelware and abrasive wheels.

Our readymade glazes are in demand across world. Our customized product development facility, makes us unique in this Industry.

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Cobalt Blue has calming properties

20191107People tend to be more productive in blue interiors as they are calm and more focused on the task. Cobalt blue reminds us of the clear blue sky and we are suddenly getting the feeling of seeing things the way they really are.

We love working with DULUX colours due to their wide range of colour choices.

Cobalt blue is a stunning colour, and it looks amazing as an upholstery on chairs or sofas.

We feel there is no medium with this colour. You either go full on in your interior or you bring this colour into the room in limited amounts.

Another use for cobalt blue could be bringing hints of this colour by tiling kitchen backsplash or table to add extra pattern and colour to the interior space. We also love to use interesting wall decorations for styling, photo shoots to bring and extra oomph to the room. Another interesting choice of cobalt blue application could be in your bathroom space.

If you are brave enough, opt in for a floor to ceiling panelling painted in the same colour or choose same colour furniture for any particular area in your house.

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What Is Vitreous Enamel Coating?

Enamel or vitreous enamel coating is really a thin layer of glass fused by heat on to the surface of a metal.

Vitreous enamel coating is part of everyday life and found all around us. It covers many kitchen surfaces including cookers, saucepans and washing machine drums. You will find vitreous enamel coating covering cast iron or steel baths and clock and watch faces. Vitreous enamel coating is also used by artists and in jewellery, famously in Russia’s Fabergé eggs.

Out of doors, we use vitreous enamel coating for street signs, Underground station signs, architectural panels, storage tanks and in lots of other places. It is selected because it is weatherproof, vandal resistant, fire proof and because it lasts and lasts and lasts. The Titanic’s Captain Smith’s bathtub vitreous enamel coating has survived very well under the sea.

We make vitreous enamel coating by melting tiny coloured glass particles on to red-hot metal in 800 degrees C furnaces. As it cools it fuses to give glass-coated metal. It all started 3500 years ago in Cyprus. Since 1500 BC enamelling has provided a wonderful, durable, attractive and reliable material.

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